Time Travel Explorer Maps

Time Travel Explorer includes high-quality digitised images of four of the most famous and important early maps of Londons

New York 1867

Matthew Dripps, 1867. This very detailed map of New York City from the Battery to Spuyten Duyvil Creek shows every lot and building, railroads and steamboat landings. It was published in an atlas with 19 hand-colored maps. Dripps published many maps of New York City and also Brooklyn and New York State. Central Park is visible on this map, having been established in 1853.

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London 1862*

This is part of Stanford's 1862 map of London, covering the area including Westminster (The Houses of Parliament), Buckingham Palace and Marble Arch in the west to the Tower of London in the east. It includes the three original cities - Westminster, Southwark and the City of London - and the area enclosed by the original city walls.

Although recognisable as the modern city there are interesting differences: Tower Bridge had yet to be built as had the Victoria Embankment, which means the river was wider than it is today - also it smelt worse as the sewers emptied directly into it. There are many other differences such as the prison on the site of what is now Tate Modern.

Perhaps the biggest change from previous maps was the the seven major railway stations in a ring around the centre of the city. As well as carving the great spokes linking London with the rest of the country, the construction of the railways led to some spectacular architectural developments such as the palace-like terminus of St Pancras.

Images of the Stanford map are provided by MOTCO Enterprises Limited. For more information, fully indexed versions on CD or print reproductions please refer to MOTCO, www.motco.com

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New York 1836

JH Colton & Co, 1836. This is a topographical map of New York. The edges contain drawings of some of the principal buildings which are included in the relevant points of interest in Time Travel Explorer. At this time the city proper had developed as far north as approximately 14th St. although there were extensive country properties and rural developments further north.

This map was sourced from xxx.

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London 1830*

Christopher and John Greenwood are best known for their maps of the English counties, although they found the competition from the new national ordnance survey meant they were unable to complete this project. However, their 1830 map of London was held to be the most accurate and legible of its time – and beautifully coloured.

Images of the Greenwood map are provided by MOTCO Enterprises Limited. For more information, fully indexed versions on CD or print reproductions please refer to MOTCO, www.motco.com

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New York 1811

William Bridges, 1811. This shows the island of Manhattan laid out with the grid pattern designed in 1807, although the majority of the island is undeveloped and some of the streets were not constructed as planned. The developed part of the city has names for streets: the grid pattern starts at 1st street in relatively undeveloped space. 

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London 1799*

Richard Horwood's PLAN of the Cities of LONDON and WESTMINSTER the Borough of SOUTHWARK and PARTS was the largest and most ambitions map of its time. It was printed on 32 sheets on which Horwood intended to show every house and its street number: although he did include every house the numbers are not complete. It was drawn for one of the many independent fire brigades that served London and remained in print from 1792 to 1819.

Images of the Horwood map are provided by MOTCO Enterprises Limited. For more information, fully indexed versions on CD or print reproductions please refer to MOTCO, www.motco.com

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London 1746*

John Rocque was born in France around 1709 and moved to England with his parents as a young child. His career began through producing drawings of new and existing garden designs which led to him becoming a surveyor and map maker. In 1747 he published his Map of London, Westminster and Southwark at a scale of 26 inches to the mile (approximately 1:2400). It was printed on 24 sheets and was the most detailed map of London published at this time. Rocque went on to publish an atlas of England and Wales and became cartographer to the Prince of Wales.

Images of the Rocque map are provided by MOTCO Enterprises Limited. For more information, fully indexed versions on CD or print reproductions please refer to MOTCO, www.motco.com

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London 1682

Morgan took 6 years to complete his survey of London "on scientific principles" - i.e. showing the familiar plan view rather than the pictorial style used by earlier cartographers. Published in 1682, this is the first detailed map produced after the Great Fire, at a scale of 300 feet to the inch and printed on 16 sheets which measured eight feet by five in total. The original is embellished with dedications, lists of subscribers, pictures, an index and many other details which encroached on the space available for the actual map. Removing all this extraneous detail leaves the version used in Time Travel Explorer with a curiously shaped outline. William Morgan was the step-grandson of another famous mapmaker, John Ogilby.

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